Getting Paid to Do What You Love

Long time web guy Jason Kottke’s announcement that he quit his web design job to work on his personal website fulltime seemed curious. Of course, a (big) part of me is jealous because I have long wished I could focus entirely on my web projects and not work for other people, so to speak. Getting paid by Marqui to link/mention them the past three months has certainly helped.

It’s interesting that he’s calling donors “micro patrons.” Micro? What’s so micro about contribting the (suggested) $30? A few years ago when people were sending each other fifty cents through PayPal — that seemed to be about micro payments. If I give someone $30 to help them out, I’d rather just be called a patron — leave out micro.

I wonder how taxes factor into this. Does he have a corporation or is he self-employed? If it’s the latter, he’ll have to say goodbye to about 37% of the donations. Unless there’s some sort of loophole I’m not familiar with.

I’m curious who else is testing out new ways to make a living without a typical 9-5 job. A few I know about include:

Update: These people aren’t necessarily doing their creative projects fulltime. That’s what I get for writing an entry while still half asleep.

Who else?

Author: Sooz

I'm Sooz.

3 thoughts on “Getting Paid to Do What You Love”

  1. I wish! Alas, Ephemera is a labor of love. I do sell the occasional print, but it’s far from supporting my life. Alas, I still require a day job like everybody else. (Fortunately, my day job rocks.)

  2. Ah, yes. I should have clarified that I was listing things people are doing to contribute to doing things that are outside the typical 9-5.

    I forgot you are at Technorati these days. You were freelancing previously, from what I remember. :)

  3. It’s the same for me, alas (both that I still need the day job, and that I’m very fortunate to like said job). Nothing would make me happier than to make a living solely off print sales, so that quixotic yearning in me had to donate to Jason – it’s a small price to pay for a little hope.

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